Penguin Book


The Economic Government of the World

Martin Daunton

One of the world's leading economic historians writes a new history of the world economy since the Second World War, charting the development of the institutions and policies that shaped it, from the emergence of the Bretton Woods system of fixed exchanges in 1944 to its collapse in 1971/3, and from the abortive creation of the International Trade Organization in 1948, to the emergence of the World Trade Organization in 1995 and the development of the so-called 'Washington Consensus'. Daunton focuses on the ways in which particular politicians, economists, central bankers, and activists grappled with issues involving matters of equity and justice, as well as matters of fixed or floating exchange rates or different trade regimes. He will ask what their aspirations and ambitions were, and why they made the decisions they did. The book will be about people making choices informed by political ambitions and cultural assumptions, rather than, as in most economic histories, the impersonal operation of economic forces. This groundbreaking work will be the cornerstone of studies on the subject for many years to come.

Martin Daunton is Professor of Economic History at Cambridge. Since 2003 he has been President of the Royal Historical Society. Previous books include Just Taxes: The Politics of Taxation in Britain 1914-79 (CUP, 2007) and Wealth and Welfare: An Economic and Social History of Britain 1851-1951 (CUP, 2007).

Division
Penguin
Publication date
03/03/2022
Category
  • BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW
Illustrations
16 pp black and white inset
Extent
672
US
Farrar Straus & Giroux Inc
Translation
Martin Daunton
Film
Martin Daunton
Serial
Martin Daunton
Audio (Unabridged)
Martin Daunton
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